Anagram Press / Springtide Press ~ Washington
(Chandler O'Leary / Jessica Spring)
 
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Artists' books by Chandler O'Leary
Artists' Books by Jessica Spring
Broadsides by Chandler O'Leary
Broadsides by Jessica Spring
 
   

Dead Feminist Series: This series is a collaboration between Chandler O'Leary of Anagram Press and Jessica Spring of Springtide Press, in honor of the social and political power of women throughout history.
   
Age Before Beauty
By Chandler O'Leary & Jessica Spring
Tacoma, Washington: Anagram Press / Springtide Press, 2016. Edition of 158.

10 x 18"; single-sheet broadside. Printed letterpress on archival 100% rag (cotton) paper on an antique Vandercook Universal One press. Handset wood type. Signed and numbered by the artists.

Significance of edition number relates to the recently-discovered "Fragment 58" of Sappho's poetry.

Chandler O'Leary: " Like every woman in our pop-culture-driven world, Jessica and I are bombarded with imagery and messages that urge us to scrutinize and criticize our own appearance. Unsurprisingly, we are taught to find ourselves lacking in one way or many, and to compare ourselves with an impossible ideal.

"We were a little surprised to find courage and consolation in Ancient Greece, where they were all about the impossible ideal. Yet if you sift through the lofty architectural theory, stylized scenes and tales of the immortals, you’ll find a honey-tongued poet who speaks the plain truth: Sappho.

"Our 23rd broadside,
Age Before Beauty, reaches further back in time than we ever have before—to the 6th century BCE. … the illustration is styled after the designs and motifs of ancient Greek pottery, right down to the amphora handles.

"Yet even though she lived and worked thousands of years ago, Sappho’s words ring true as if they were written yesterday. We especially loved her self-reflection in the poem we chose, and the way she managed to view her aging body with kindness. It brought to mind, for me, an image of dual goddesses who are really two faces of the same woman—like the Maiden and Crone archetypes so common in other pre-Christian cultures.

"Like the art of ancient Greece, the illustration is chock full of allegorical imagery. For instance, young Sappho carries Aphrodite’s mirror, while Athena’s wise owl looks over her aged self. Both figures play a seven-stringed lyre: Sappho was a lyrical poet, which means her poetry was designed to be performed to music. (Incidentally, some scholars also credit Sappho with the invention of the plectrum, a tool similar to a guitar pick that was used to pluck the lyre’s strings.) Finally, the band of dancing deer at the base references Josephine Balmer’s recent translation of Sappho’s Old Age Poem."
$40


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Title Nine Iron
Illustrated by Chandler O'Leary
Printed by Jessica Spring
Tacoma, Washington: Anagram Press / Springtide Press, 2015. Edition of 143.

10 x 18"; single-sheet broadside. Printed letterpress on archival 100% rag (cotton) paper on an antique Vandercook Universal One press.. Handset wood type. Signed and numbered by the artists.

Chandler O'Leary: "[F]or our newest Dead Feminist broadside, we’ve unleashed the irrepressible showmanship of golfer and all-star athlete Babe Didrikson Zaharias. Title Nine Iron is a tribute to Babe’s best sport (with a nod to her beginnings as a track star), decked out in golf plaids and bright fairways. Follow the flags around the course with Babe’s quote, and let her words lift you over the rough and onto the green.

"To help give girls everywhere equal access to sports and athletic training, we are donating a portion of our proceeds to the Women’s Sports Foundation. Founded in 1974 by tennis legend Billie Jean King, the Women’s Sports Foundation works to advance the lives of girls and women through physical activity."


Colophon: "Mildred Ella 'Babe' Didrikson Zaharias (1911 – 1956) grew up in Port Arthur, Texas. Babe reportedly earned her nickname playing baseball with neighborhood boys. She mastered every sport she played, including basketball, track and field, golf, tennis, diving, bowling, billiards and archery. When asked if there was anything she didn’t play, Babe said, 'Yeah, dolls.'

"In 1932, Didrickson entered an Amateur Athletic Union track and field championship as a one-woman team. She won six events, setting world records for the high jump, 80-meter hurdles, javelin and baseball throw. That same year, she won Olympic gold medals for the javelin and 80-meter hurdles and a silver medal in the high jump. Babe began playing golf in 1935, competing in the men’s PGA tournament paired with golfer, pro wrestler, and future husband George Zaharias. Over her career, Babe won an unprecedented 17 straight women’s amateur victories and a total of 82 golf tournaments. A founding member of the Ladies Professional Golf Association, she was fiercely competitive and an entertainer on the course, challenging accepted notions of femininity and athleticism despite constant media scrutiny.

"Babe was diagnosed with rectal cancer in 1953. A year after a colostomy, she won the U.S. Women’s Open, inspiring cancer survivors with her victory. Golfer Betty Dodd played LPGA tours with Babe, eventually moving in with her and George for the last years of Babe’s life. Their intimate relationship was never publicly acknowledged. Babe’s cancer returned and she died at age 45. In 1999 the Associated Press named her Woman Athlete of the 20th Century."

It’s not enough just to swing at the ball. You’ve got to loosen your girdle and let ‘er fly.

$100


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Common Thread
By Chandler O'Leary / Jessica Spring
Tacoma, Washington: Anagram Press / Springtide Press, 2014. Edition of 145.

10 x 18"; single-sheet broadside. Printed letterpress on archival 100% rag (cotton) paper. Handset wood type. Illustrated by Chandler O'Leary. Printed by Jessica Spring. Signed and numbered by the artists.

Chandler O'Leary: "This piece is a collaboration between Chandler O'Leary of Anagram Press and Jessica Spring of Springtide Press, created in memory of the victims of both the recent terrorist attacks in Paris and the Holocaust of World War II.

"As seems to happen on a regular basis, religion and extremism are in the news again. The first instance, the recent violence in France, is a horribly fresh reminder of what we brace for every day in modern society. The second is the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz in January—which, when paired with the terrorist acts in Paris, underscores the importance of learning from our past.


"In another example of history made new again, the world has only recently discovered the incredible story of a young girl whose faith and diary carried her through one of the darkest times in human history. It is this story that we set out to tell with our 21st Dead Feminist broadside, 'Common Threads.'

"The piece is a winter garden of pale pastels and subtle metallic golds. The delicate colors and shining metallic ink (which includes real gold in the formula) represent the fragility and preciousness of life among the thorns of war and persecution. The floral motif echoes themes from Rywka's diary, and stands for the resilience of the Jewish people—whose culture has flourished beautifully despite some of the worst trials endured by humankind.

"The overall design of the broadside is based on Rywka's dual cultural heritage. The border is reminiscent of Jewish embroidered challah covers and sabbath cloths, while the style of floral illustration is derived from Polish folk florals. The stitched lines are a nod to Rywka's trade as seamstress, which she viewed optimistically as a way to move forward and make a living in a future beyond wartime.


Colophon: "Rywka Lipszyc (1929 – 1945?) kept a diary from October 1943 to April 1944, while living in Poland’s Lódz ghetto. Discovered by a Russian doctor in the crematoria remains at Auschwitz-Birkenau, the diary was published in 2014, sharing Rywka’s amazing story with the world. Her parents and three siblings perished in Nazi ghettos and killing centers. Despite horrible living conditions Rywka survived, working in the ghetto’s clothing and linen workshop, learning to sew, organizing a library, and attending classes. Her diary ends abruptly, but records reveal she was deported to Auschwitz, then liberated to a field hospital after the war’s end. No further trace of her has been found, but Rywka’s words survive, a reminder of her incredible faith despite all odds — and her dream of becoming a writer fulfilled."
$100


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The Veil of Knowledge
No. 20 in the Dead Feminists series
By Chandler O'Leary / Jessica Spring
Tacoma, Washington: Anagram Press / Springtide Press, 2014. Edition of 125.4.*

10 x 18"; single-sheet broadside. Printed letterpress on archival 100% rag (cotton) paper. Handset wood type. Illustrated by Chandler O’Leary and printed by Jessica Spring. Signed and numbered by the artists.

*Chandler O'Leary, Edition numbering: "Every broadside has a symbolic edition number, but this piece is extra special. This number is the solution to an equation we devised out of numbers that are highly symbolic in Islam. Arabic culture is credited with the invention of algebra—a term derived from an Arabic word meaning 'the reunion of broken parts.' We arrived at our edition number by multiplying 66 (the number that represents Allah in Islamic numerology) by 19 (considered by some mystics to be the 'Key to the Q’uran'), and then dividing the result by 10 (ten-pointed stars are common elements in Arabesque patterning, as well as our broadside design). The '.4' in our edition number represents four artist proofs that exist outside the numbered edition, and set aside as gifts for four important women in our lives. These four women mirror the four 'Women of the First Rank in Islam' (Khadijah, first wife of the Prophet; Fatimah, the fourth daughter of Khadijah and the Prophet, and the wife of the Fourth Caliph; the Virgin Mary; and Asiya, wife of the pharaoh and stepmother to Moses)."

Colophon: "Fatima Al-Fihri (c. 800 – 880) grew up in Fez, Morocco with her sister Miriam, daughters of a wealthy Tunisian merchant. The daughters were well-educated and devoted to their community. After the death of their father, Fatima vowed to spend all her inheritance in building a mosque, both a place for worship and a center of learning. In 859, she founded Al-Qarawiyyin, which offered courses in grammar, rhetoric, logic, medicine, mathematics, astronomy, chemistry, history, geography and music — drawing scholars and students from all over the world. (Gerbert of Auverge — later Pope Sylvester II — studied there, and was credited with the introduction of Arabic numbers and the concept of zero to Europe.) This important spiritual and educational center of the Islamic world, one of the largest mosques in Africa, is considered the oldest university still in operation. As a woman with such generosity and vision, Fatima is remembered and honored as Oum al Banine, 'the mother of the children.'”

Chandler O'Leary: "The Veil of Knowledge —a piece that has been weighing heavily on our hearts and minds. Our journey began in April [2014], when over 200 girls were kidnapped from their school in Chibok, Nigeria. Since then the media has been filled with accusations leveled at Islam—a culture we know to have a long history of valuing education, innovation, and knowledge. We also know that the danger of extremism knows no cultural boundary—and that it would benefit us all to build a world where every girl has the opportunity and security to obtain an education.

"So after months of exhaustive research, we decided to go back in time to some of the earliest days of higher education, and to the life and work of Fatima al-Fihri … . Because Fatima lived in the 9th century, no direct quotes have made it to the present era. Instead, the piece highlights Fatima’s honorific title: Oum al Banine, or 'Mother of the Children.'


"The phrase weaves through the piece like the mortar between stones, repeating again and again like a mantra. The design mirrors the Arabesque decorative style, as well as the common practice of decorating Muslim houses of worship with text (often phrases from the Qur’an). Because it is forbidden to depict the Prophet in Islam, architecture is usually adorned with text and geometric patterns instead.

"Our 20th Dead Feminist broadside, The Veil of Knowledge, is an ornate tribute to Fatima’s world and the institution she founded. The composition, structured like a Persian manuscript page, features an illustration based on the architecture of Al-Qarawiyyin, with its angular rooflines and sweeping curved arches. Interspersed throughout the piece is a hand-drawn geometric pattern that mirrors the tilework throughout the university and mosque. Wrapping around the 'walls' behind a pair of columns is the Basmala (the phrase that begins every sura or chapter of the Qur’an), lettered in Arabic script.

"To help ensure the safety and quality of girls’ education worldwide, we are donating a portion of our proceeds to Girl Up — a nonprofit campaign of the United Nations Foundation that assists some of the world’s hardest-to-reach adolescent girls."

$100


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Focal Point
By Chandler O'Leary and Jessica Spring
Tacoma, Washington: Anagram Press / Springtide Press, 2013. Edition of 147.

10 x 18"; single-sheet broadside. Printed letterpress on archival 100% rag (cotton) paper. Handset wood type. Illustrated by Chandler O'Leary and printed by Jessica Spring. Signed and numbered by the artist and printer.

Chandler O'Leary: "Our 19th Dead Feminist broadside, Focal Point, is a big departure from previous prints in the series. For the first time ever, the piece is printed on rich, deep black paper — which makes the brilliant metallic gold of the quote pop into focus. Surrounding the text is an intricate metallic silver filigree of spring botanicals and portraiture, creating a pastiche of the subjects of some of Imogen Cunningham's most iconic photographs. In the eye of the storm of imagery is the all-seeing camera lens, looking out onto the world.

"To help sharpen the seeing eyes of the artists of tomorrow, we're donating a portion of our proceeds to Youth in Focus — a nonprofit that puts cameras in the hands of at-risk youth to 'teach them how to develop negatives into positives.'


Colophon: "Imogen Cunningham (1883 - 1976) graduated from the University of Washington in 1907, earning a degree in chemistry with her thesis on chemical processes in photography. Shortly afterward she was hired by photographer Edward Curtis, who taught her platinum printing and portraiture. She opened her own successful studio in Seattle, and published an article entitled 'Photography as a Profession for Women.' In 1917, Cunningham and her husband and son relocated to California, where she gave birth to twin boys. Her children and the plants in her garden then became key subjects of her work. Her experiments with double exposure throughout the 1920s and 30s contributed to a growing appreciation of photography as art. She was a founding member of Group f/64, a collective of influential west coast photographers including Ansel Adams and Edward Weston. The group mounted a 1932 exhibition at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, united by a manifesto declaring 'photography as an art form by simple and direct presentation.' Cunningham’s vision came through in both her personal and commercial work: unvarnished celebrity portraits for Vanity Fair; documentary street photography; nudes and botanical images — a lifetime of work that continues to challenge and intrigue viewers."
$100

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Gun Shy
By Jessica Spring and Chandler O'Leary
Tacoma, Washington: Springtide Press/Anagram Press, 2013.
Edition of 151.

10 x 18"; single-sheet broadside. Printed letterpress on archival 100% rag (cotton) paper. Handset wood type. Signed and numbered by the artists.

This broadside featuring Annie Oakley, dubbed Little Sure-Shot by Chief Sitting Bull, is one in the Dead Feminists broadside series by Anagram Press and Springtide Press.

Springtide Press: "This hand-pulled letterpress print is printed from hand-lettered original typography and hand-drawn illustrations and patterns (in fact, everything was done by hand, the hard way!). This piece is a collaboration between Chandler O'Leary of Anagram Press and Jessica Spring of Springtide Press, in solidarity with those stand up for the rights and equality of all, despite the considerable might of the powerful few."

Chandler O'Leary: "This has not been an easy post to write—and yet in a way it’s been writing itself over and over again, for years now. To be honest, Jessica and I designed this broadside months ago, and planned to release it shortly after last year’s theater shooting in Aurora, CO. Other projects got in the way, and then the 2012 election persuaded us to table the piece for the time being.

"We should have known: until there’s serious change in our society, this subject will always be hatefully relevant.

"So here we are again, on the heels of yet another rash of terrible violence. But this time feels different—not only because of the sheer horror of the Newtown tragedy, but because at last, our country is having the conversation it needs to have.

"At the center of the debate is the precarious balance of right and responsibility—and here’s where I need to keep from shooting my mouth off. I’ve written and deleted a hundred sentences about Jessica’s and my personal thoughts on the subject—but I have a feeling you can already guess what they are. And we also recognize that our beliefs represent just one side of our divided culture. So the thought of pontificating just wearies and saddens us; we’d much rather focus on how we might move forward, together.

"For us, that meant starting with an attempt to comprehend the other side of the debate. So in hoping to understand the love of guns many in our country share, we looked to legendary sharpshooter Annie Oakley, whose words pierce the heart of the matter."

Aim at a high mark, work for the future.

$100


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Signed, Sealed, Soapbox
By Jessica Spring and Chandler O'Leary
Tacoma, Washington: Springtide Press / Anagram Press, 2011. Edition of 176.
10 x 18"; single-sheet broadside. Printed letterpress on archival 100% rag (cotton) paper. Handset wood type. Signed and numbered by the artists.

Springtide Press: "This hand-pulled letterpress print is printed from hand-lettered original typography and hand-drawn illustrations and patterns (in fact, everything was done by hand, the hard way!). This piece is a collaboration between Chandler O'Leary of Anagram Press and Jessica Spring of Springtide Press, in solidarity with those stand up for the rights and equality of all, despite the considerable might of the powerful few.

"This is our first broadside that features two Dead Feminists at once—and includes our very first male Dead Feminist. Signed, Sealed, Soapbox is a correspondence between Jane Mecom and her brother, Benjamin Franklin. Their quotes are accompanied by excerpts—word-for-word, including any original spelling errors and colonial-era grammar—from their letters to one another, each in a hand-lettered style based on Ben and Jane's actual handwriting.

"There are few Founding Fathers more famous than Ben Franklin, but his sister Jane was somewhat of a mystery. What we do know is that Jane had a very different life than her illustrious brother. Thanks to the simple fact of having been born female, her youth was spent having babies rather than obtaining an education. Her life was marked with misfortune, poverty and the deaths of nearly everyone she loved. Yet through it all she craved knowledge, and read everything she could get her hands on. She was a skilled craftsperson, making the famed Franklin Crown Soap and teaching the trade to others. And she followed her brother's career with pride—and he supported her in return, both financially and emotionally.

"
Signed, Sealed, Soapbox is illustrated with the sweeping curves of ornate penmanship and the detailed lifework of colonial engravings. A faux-bois forest of branches and flowers resembles the printed toile fabrics of the day. The swoops and swirls of the calligraphy rest in stately Wedgwood blue (complimented by a telltale vase at the bottom!), while Ben and Jane's correspondence occupies a butter-yellow letter edged like a vintage postage stamp. And though there is no surviving likeness of Jane Mecom, she deserves much more than the portrait of a Jane Doe. Instead, she is made in the image of the 'Comtesse d'Haussonville' by French painter Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres.

"In honor of Ben's positive brotherly influence, a portion of the proceeds from Signed, Sealed, Soapbox will be donated to the Puget Sound chapter of Big Brothers, Big Sisters—an organization dedicated to providing children facing adversity with mentor relationships that change their lives for the better, forever."


Chandler O'Leary: "It’s hard to ignore the news of protests occupying the attention of cities around the world—of the many and diverse thousands of people unified under one simple, yet infinitely faceted mantra. As members of the, well, vast majority of folks without any real political or financial clout in the world, Jessica and I can get behind their message—but that’s not so much the point. What really amazes us is that with a little tenacity and strength in numbers, the powerless can suddenly become very powerful, indeed.

"It made us think of a woman who, despite having a famous sibling, would have disappeared into obscurity but for the simple act of picking up a pen.

"Jane had both energy and persistence in spades, although we marvel at how she managed it, with twelve kids, a family business and a house perpetually full of boarders to occupy her attention. Yet of Benjamin’s sixteen siblings, Jane is the only one whose story has survived the 200+ years since her death—all because she committed her thoughts to paper. So in honor of Ben and Jane’s relationship, and in solidarity with those who find the strength to speak up, we present our first dual Dead Feminist broadside,
Signed, Sealed, Soapbox."
$100


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Out of print Broadsides in Dead Feminist Series:  
   
Nightsong
By Chandler O'Leary and Jessica Spring
Tacoma, Washington: Anagram Press'/Springtide Press, 2013. Edition of 147.

10 x 18"; single-sheet broadside. Printed letterpress on archival 100% rag (cotton) paper. Handset wood type. Illustrated by Chandler O'Leary and printed by Jessica Spring. Signed and numbered by the artists.

Chandler O'Leary: "...worldwide, over and over again, the plans and dreams of so many women and girls are cut short by violence. In light of recent high-profile crimes halfway around the world, Jessica and I thought it was high time we spoke up. This time we drew inspiration from the Nightingale of India..."

"
Nightsong honors the hopes and dreams of women and girls in every culture – in defiance of the world's dangers. The illustration depicts a lush dream menagerie printed in bright, exotic hues. Tigers, peacocks, elephants, and nightingales stand sentinel around our heroine, surrounded by detailed paisleys and florals drawn in the style of Indian mehndi designs.

"To make this print more dreamlike, we decided to throw a tricky technique called split-foundation printing into the mix – or 'rainbow roll,' for short.

"A split foundation is extremely difficult to control (advanced Eagle Scout printing here, folks), but the results are so lovely that it's absolutely worth the effort. As an added bonus, we were careful to keep our inks translucent – so when we registered the second color, that mixed with the colors even further, giving us an entire rainbow spectrum with just two passes on press.

"I should add, though, that while we love printing with a rainbow roll, the process is completely unpredictable, and the finish prints are far from uniform. So rather than an edition of absolutely identical broadsides, we ended up with a beautiful range of yellows, oranges, pinks, and even reds, that vary from print to print.

"To help restore hope to victims and in honor of our dreams for the future, a portion of our proceeds will be donated to Take Back the Night in order to create safe communities. Take Back the Night seeks to end sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual abuse, and all other forms of sexual violence."


Colophon: "Sarojini Chattopadhyay Naidu (1879 - 1949) — also known as 'The Nightingale of India' — was born in Hyderabad, the eldest of eight children. She was a gifted student, proficient in five languages, and by age 16 left the country to attend King’s College to pursue her interest in poetry. Inspired by the suffragist movement in England, she joined the struggle for Indian independence, traveling the country to lecture on social welfare, women’s rights and nationalism. Naidu played a leading role during the Civil Disobedience Movement and was jailed along with Gandhi. Naidu wrote beautiful lyrical poetry, focused on Indian themes, to inspire the nation. She was the first woman to serve as president of the Indian National Congress, and the first woman to become the Governor of the state of Uttar Pradesh. Though Naidu humbly claimed, 'I am only a woman, only a poet,' her birthday is celebrated as Women’s Day throughout India."
$40 (SOLD)

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Page last update: 03.10.17

 

   
  
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